Calendar

<<  October 2014  >>
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
293012345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
272829303112
3456789

View posts in large calendar


Read our regular staff blog and get a behind-the-scenes-view of life and work at Stirling Castle.

Summer Sensibility

by StirlingCastle 31. July 2014 10:12

We’re delighted to be working with Chapterhouse, the open air theatre company, to bring one of Jane Austen’s best loved works to life next week.



Sense and Sensibility tells the story of two young sisters, romantic Marianne and rational Elinor Dashwood, as they take their first foray into eighteenth century society, in a tale of love, friendship and sisterly bonds. The death of the sisters' father brings their world of privilege into doubt.


The novel was first published in 1811 under the pseudonym ‘A Lady’. It was to be Jane Austen’s first published novel but only her immediate family were aware of her authorship, an anonymity would last until her death until 1817. The first edition of Sense and Sensibility sold out all 750 copies by July 1813, which was followed by a second edition. It is regarded as one of Austen’s best loved works and has been the subject of numerous adaptations, including perhaps most famously a 1995 film starring Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet.


Come and enjoy the tale of courtship, young love and high society at Stirling Castle on Thursday 7 August. As the performance is taking place in the great outdoors, bring along your own seat or rug, enjoy a picnic and remember to dress appropriately for Scottish weather – but most of all get lost in this superb story!


Buy tickets and find out more information

Currently rated 5.0 by 1 people

  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags: , , , , ,

Stirling Castle

Stirling - The Heart of Scotland

by StirlingCastle 15. July 2014 05:34

Once the capital of Scotland, Stirling was the seat of power for some our greatest monarchs and the backdrop to epic battles fought and won by heroes like Wallace and Bruce.   It was strategically and spiritually the heart of Scotland.


Today Stirling is still a great city with so much to see and do, only now the heart comes from the pride and passion that people in the area put in to welcoming visitors from near and far.  If you are planning a visit to the castle this summer why not make a day of it or even plan a break to Scotland’s Heart and experience everything that this historic and vibrant city has to offer.  You won’t be disappointed!


Check out our guide to some of the other attractions and events in the area.


1.  Battle of Bannockburn Visitor Centre
The brand new Battle of Bannockburn experience puts you in the heart of the action. With cutting edge 3D technology, you can experience medieval combat like never before and learn about this crucial event in Scottish history.




2.  The National Wallace Monument
Recently refurbished, Stirling's renowned landmark, commemorating the life of Sir William Wallace, is a must.  See Wallace’s sword, listen to his trial and climb to the crown where you can enjoy magnificent views. Show your castle ticket for 10% discount on entry.



3. Blair Drummond Safari and Adventure Park
Spend an exciting day at Scotland's Safari Park. Drive through animal reserves, take a boat trip around Chimp Island or watch amazing sea lion shows and bird of prey displays.  The park also has a pet’s farm, adventure playground and pedal boats.  Fun for all the family guaranteed!


4.  Whisky Galore
Stirling is lucky enough to have two fantastic distilleries.  Deanston Distillery started life as a cotton mill before being transformed into a distillery in 1966 where, to this day, it produces an outstanding Highland single malt whisky using traditional methods. The history of Tullibardine as a location for brewing and distilling is one of the oldest in Scotland. Located in Blackford, the gateway to the Highlands, it was here in 1488 that the young King James 4th of Scotland stopped by on his way to his coronation, to purchase beer from the local brewery. This is recorded as the first public purchase of beer. In 1503 the brewery received the first Royal Charter issued by James IV, in recognition of the fine beer produced at Tullibardine.


5.  Old Town
A quick stroll from the castle, Stirling’s old town boasts the finest concentration of historic buildings in Scotland.  See the remains of Mar’s Wark or visit Scotland’s oldest living Church to have held a coronation (James VI), the Holy Rude. The Tolbooth, now an arts and live music venue has served as a jail, courthouse and even hosted a parliament while Cowane's Hospital, a 17th century almshouse was converted into a guild hall and is currently home to a delightful café. Add some excitement to your visit by joining a Stirling Walking Tour or Ghost Walk.


6. The Macobert Centre
Based at Stirling University, the macrobert is the premier arts centre for Stirling and the Forth Valley and a cultural hub for Scotland. It offers a huge variety of activities with over 400 live performances of drama, comedy, opera, dance, music, musical theatre and art exhibitions. Their cinema – The Norman McLaren filmhouse – screens a year-round programme of blockbusters, arthouse movies, classics, documentaries, world cinema and children’s films.


7.  Highland Fling
Stirling is a magnificent setting for some fantastic events including the ancient pursuit of a Scottish Highland Games.  See how far competitors can toss the caber, enjoy some highland dancing and listen to the stirring sounds of a traditional pipe band.  Also on offer crafts, trade stalls and plenty of fine food and drink.  Bridge of Allan Highland Games takes place on Sunday 3rd August with Stirling Highland Games following a few weeks later on Saturday 16th August.


8. The Smith Art Gallery and Museum
If Stirling is Scotland’s heart, the Stirling Smith Art Gallery and Museum is its soul. All of the special objects and paintings relating to the history and culture of Stirling are gathered here, with the purpose to collect, record, interpret and show the story of Stirling to the world, and the world to Stirling. On permanent display is the burgh seal of Stirling dating back to 1286, the town’s weights and measures and the oldest football in the world found in the rafters of Stirling Castle.


9.  Other Historic Scotland sites
Stirling Castle isn’t the only historic Scotland property in the area.  Doune Castle is just a few miles down the road.  A magnificent monument that has been used as a film setting for Monty Python and the Holy Grail and more recently Outlander.  Meanwhile Castle Campbell is a proper fairytale castle.  Set in the stunning surrounds of the Dollar Glen, it transports you to another time. Consider investing in an Historic Scotland Explorer Pass or Membership if you want to save some money.


10.  Loch Katrine Experience
Loch Katrine, from the gaelic for “highland thief or robber”, is undoubtedly one of Scotland’s special places. Set against the backdrop of the Trossachs, the loch is surrounded by hills, mountains and woodlands. A favourite tourism destination for avid adventurers, international tourists and families throughout the year, many of whom come for a cruise on our famous steamship, Sir Walter Scott.


Destination Stirling has a very good website where you can find out all about Stirling from accommodation to eating out and what’s on. 

Scotland’s People

by StirlingCastle 9. July 2014 10:03

Ancestry is something very close to the heart of a lot of our visitors and a major reason that many people visit Scotland.  This is why it is one of the five pillars of Homecoming 2014.



To prepare Historic Scotland staff for an influx of enquiries, Iain Ferguson from Scotland’s People has been delivering a series of seminars so that our teams can advise visitors on how to research their Scottish Ancestry and maybe even start compiling their own family tree.
 




Scotland’s People has all the key Scottish records from birth, marriage and death records, to wills, census records, Coats of Arms and valuation rolls. The main National Records Building  in Edinburgh Princes Street is a great place to start. A full or part day at the centre costs just £15 and gives a great introduction to the process as well as access to researchers that can help with  individual enquiries. There are additional family centres located at Glasgow, Kilmarnock, Hawick and Inverness.  


For those that can’t make it along to one of the above centres, you can also do your research online.  Registration is free and you can search the indexes for the Coats of Arms and wills and testament records for no charge. To view the other records you need to purchase credits but these are very reasonably priced.


So if you are interested in finding out more about your Scottish roots now’s the time to start.



For more information about ScotlandsPeople and how to book a search place at the Centre in Edinburgh visit www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk


Historic Scotland has also produced a brochure that features some of the major Scottish Clans and properties in our portfolio relating to them.  You can view or download our Family Footsteps brochure from our website.

Currently rated 5.0 by 2 people

  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags: , , ,

history